PM WRONG: SECULARISM IS NOT A 'BELIEF'. IT IS THE RIGHT TO HAVE ONE

Dear Prime Minister, you need to do your research. Secularism is NOT a belief like any other religious or non-religious life-stance. It is a political process. It is not a belief: it is the right to have or not to have one. The concept has been wrongly equated with atheism.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison recently said that Australia is not a secular country, and that secularism 'is just one belief system among any belief system you choose', with 'no greater claim than any other on our society' and '[t]he constitution provides for freedom of religion, not from religion'.
Dear Prime Minister, you need to do your research. Secularism is NOT a belief like any other religious or non-religious life-stance. It is a political process. It is not a belief: it is the right to have or not have one. The concept has been wrongly equated with atheism. Due to fear of being branded an atheist and anti-religious, people avoid identifying with it, or even discussing it. We can distinguish between the two concepts of secularisation and secularism. Whereas secularisation denotes concentration on worldly matters by religious communities, secularism is the process by which government is concerned with cohesion and welfare of diverse religious and cultural communities. The two are distinct.
Politicians repeatedly misrepresent the meaning of political secularism and state-religion relationships. This has become tedious, and they should know better.
As a signatory to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Australia recognises that reigion and non-belief are equal rights. A simple logical analysis of the right to freedom of thought, conscience and belief in Article 18 of the Covenant, and s.116 of the Australian Constitution, means the government has undertaken to remain neutral on the matter of religion.

Continue: Why Secularism?